The Courage to Say Goodbye to the Church of Rotten Fruit

Christ simply said, “I never knew you. Go away from Me, you who do wrong!”

Project 3, Post 7: The Courage to Say Goodbye to the Church of Rotten Fruit

This is my final post in this series on dealing with apostasy, with heresy in our churches. This post will be the most difficult for you to read, to hear. There comes a time when courage is needed to overcome our fears and also, perhaps more importantly, our immense sadness.

You may read PART 6 HERE, PART 5 HERE, PART 4 HERE, PART 3 HERE, PART 2 HERE, AND PART 1 HERE.

Before I continue, take a moment to pray with me:

Lord,

Please bless each reader, sending the Holy Spirit to guide them as they read this important post. Grant each individual Your holy power to read, to hear, and to interpret Your Word, Your Gospel with Your divine wisdom. Grant each one of Your precious children the Courage needed to use the information below for Your Holy Purposes. Please send Your angels to protect them, Lord.

In the name of your son, Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, Amen.

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The finished painting of the tree.

Let us begin…

Imagine for a moment that you are walking through a forest, your dearest friend at your side.

Together you remark on the many trees: some trees are very large, with outstretched branches, while other trees are far slighter in stature, able to nimbly sway in the breeze. All of the trees in this forest are beautiful.

The two if you soon come upon a fork in the path.

To the left, the heavily trodden path widens, and it appears smooth and welcoming.

To the right, the path is far narrower, with spouts of grass peeking through the seldom-trodden dirt. In the distance you can see hills.

After a short argument, you and your friend decide to go your separate ways:

Your friend adamantly chooses to venture down path to the left.

You, conversely, choose the path to the right.

“A wise man’s heart inclines to the right, but the heart of a fool to the left.”

Ecclesiastes 10:2

As you walk along the narrow path, you notice that the many trees have borne fruit, even the smaller ones.

Thirsty from your walk, you pick a plum from one of the trees as you pass. The fruit is crisp and sweet. The juices drip down your chin.

As you continue walking, a soft rain shower soothes you from the sun’s warm rays and quenches the thirst of the many trees along the path.

After some time had passed, you came to realize that each of the trees along the narrow path are a congregation of believers.

You could hear a multitude of voices singing hymns of praise emanating from within the trees. Though he road is narrow and bumpy at times, you discovered that a guiding hand was readily there to steady you should you stumble.

Having heeded the Lord’s call to “Expel the wicked persons from among you,” the multitude were in holy unity in righteousness, “all of the believers were in one heart and mind,” as the anointed among them preached the One, the Only, the Holy Good News! (1 Corinthians 5:13; Acts 4:32; Galatians 1:7)

You found yourself filled with joy, your load lifted.

“Go in through the narrow door.

The door is wide and the road is easy that leads to hell.

Many people are going through that door.

But the door is narrow and the road is hard that leads to life that last forever.

Few people are finding it.”

Matthew 7:13-14

This was not the case for your dearest friend who chose to wander leftward down the wide path…

He, too, heard singing and saw many people gathering within each of the giant trees.

He heard enthusiastic preachers shouting sermons to the masses.

Walking the wide path among many large and beautiful trees, your friend, too, became thirsty.

He, too, picked a plum to moisten his mouth.

However, the plum was rotten.

When he bit into the plum he found the fruit to be dry and sour, and his mouth became filled with worms.

Still, your friend was convinced that a good fruit could be found among such beautiful, powerful, grand trees.

He searched and he searched for one good fruit.

As your friend walked onward, he passed several strangers fleeing the wide path toward the narrow road which you, yourself, had taken.

One stranger warned your friend to not be deceived by the grandeur and beauty of the large trees lining the smooth, well-trodden path, proclaiming that Satan himself masquerades as an angel of light,” (2 Corinthians 11:14).

The other stranger reminded him, Do not deceive yourselves. If any of you think you are wise by the standards of this age, you should become “fools” so that you may become wise,” (1 Corinthians 3:18).

“Come with us,” the strangers pleaded.

Yet, your dearest friend thought himself to be quite wise. Thus, he continued his search for good fruit, traveling further down the wide road.

And as the two kindly strangers fled the wide path for the narrow, saddened by their inability to convince your dear friend to join them in reversing course, the two strangers were comforted by whispers of reassurance from Christ, His words spoken upon their hearts.

Christ softly instructed the strangers, Let the dead bury their own dead, but you go and proclaim the kingdom of God,” (Luke 9:60).

Meanwhile, your dearest friend, his throat parched, his brow wet from the warm sun, continued his search for a piece of good fruit down the wide path…

One fruit after another, all of the fruit was rotten, and your dearest friend’s thirst was left unquenched.

Before long, as he walked the wide road, the air became clouded with smoke. With each step he saw fewer and fewer trees, but more and more stumps where trees had one been.

Finally, your dearest friend came upon a giant inferno; thick black smoke bellowed upward into the air.

In the fire he could see the burnt remnants of trees. He could hear cries of agony: these were the cries of the parishioners, of the proud  preachers, as they called out to God above.

Your dear friend heard the tormented calls from the enthusiastic preachers, hollering “Lord, Lord, did we not preach in Your Name? Did we not put out demons in Your Name? Did we not do many powerful works in Your Name?”

Finally, as your friend stood there by the raging fire, he heard Christ answer those preachers and those congregants with an abrupt condemnation.

Christ simply said, “I never knew you. Go away from Me, you who do wrong!” (Matthew 7:23).

“Watch out for false teachers.

They come to you dressed as if they were sheep. On the inside they are hungry wolves.

You will know them by their fruit. Do men pick grapes from thorns? Do men pick figs from thistles? It is true, every good tree has good fruit. Every bad tree has bad fruit. A good tree cannot have bad fruit. A bad tree cannot have good fruit.

Every tree that does not have good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire.

So, you will know them by their fruit.”

Matthew 7:15-20

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The finished painting of the tree.

“Assuredly the New Theology can do no good towards God or man; it, has no adaptation for it. If it were preached for a thousand years by all the most earnest men of the school, it would never renew a soul, nor overcome pride in a single human heart.”

Charles Spurgeon

Now, let’s put this into context.

Our American churches are ripe with apostasy, limbs hang drooped, heavy from fouled fruit.

Loving correction under our present circumstances is difficult and the chances of success are grim, considering the advanced stage of Biblical departure in which many churches now find themselves.

More often than not, and this is especially true for denominational churches, a church’s leadership will turn a blind eye to apostasy/heresy when confronted with the truth.

Some churches will claim that objections weren’t submitted in proper form, and, at other churches, a laundry list of regulations/restrictions/red tape will spring forth preventing concerns from ever being addressed. Still, at other churches, the elders will huddle around the accused to shield him from rebuke… all the while these same elders cast doubts upon your credibility.

Some denominations have handed over far too much power to councils or organizations, elevating the voices of a few men while providing these men the image of legitimacy which comes with fancy titles. These small groups of cohorts (such as the Southern Baptists’ Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, for example) are easily taken over by those who ambitiously seek their own glory and who wish to further their own agendas at the expense of the Gospel Truth.

The reality of our present circumstances is this: churches and their organizations will, far more often than not, punish the person(s) who shine a light onto the error taking place, while protecting the perpetrators from correction, ensuring the perpetrators’ reputations remain intact.

“A wise son heeds his father’s instruction, but a mocker does not respond to rebukes.”

Proverbs 13:1

REMEMBER, it only takes a tiny amount of yeast to make the entire loaf of bread rise (Galatians 5:7-9). It only takes a little bit of error to pervert the whole of your church, sending it down the wide, easy, heavy-trodden road to Hell.

When error is not addressed, it grows.

Or, as Paul aptly put it,their message will spread like cancer,” (2 Timothy 2:17).

Do you expect for a church which has abandoned core truths to put a sign out advertising their apostasy?

No way!

As scripture informs, the departure from the narrow path onto the wide road to Hell will occur subtly, undetected, with many unaware (Jude 4).

As the Rev., Dr. Paul Elliot has stated:

“Like cancer in the human body, false teaching in the body of the church begins undetected and unrecognized. By the time Christians who are still true to the Word of God recognize the cancer of false teaching and are stirred to action, often it is too late to stop its deadly progress. The damage has been done, and a spiritual crisis is upon the church.” 

So, then what?

What should you do if efforts at correction have passed by unheeded?

This, sweet beloved, is where your own path may take a heart wrenching turn.

Thus, bearing in mind Christ’s warning that that the path to salvation is narrow, and that only a few will find it, because the wide road often mimics the narrow road… and bearing in mind that the wide road leads to Hell… You must LEAVE.

That’s right: you must bid farewell to your beloved church. And you must welcome the sadness and the mourning that such a departure will assuredly bring upon you with a joyful, humble heart.

Do not be yoked together with unbelievers. For what partnership can consist of righteousness and lawlessness? Or what fellowship can light have with darkness?”

 2 Corinthians 6:14

Yes, you will in deed mourn, as I have been mourning since departing from my own beloved church.

Yet, there is but one True Body of Christ.

It does not consist of four walls. Nor a particular denomination. Nor a wide, liberal tent. For if it did, then the late, great Charles Spurgeon wouldn’t have left the Baptist Union.

Nor does not constitute a schism to depart from an apostate church or  an apostate denomination.

Rather, it does constitute a schism to remain yoked to the unrighteous.

If we were destined to remain in unity with evil (which we should never do), then the late, great Dr. J. Gresham Machen wouldn’t have departed the Presbyterian Church of the USA.

In your cowardice, you perpetuate a schism within the true body of Christ by remaining tied to those who have chosen a the wide path, the popular path, the easy path  that ultimately leads to Hell.

Having gone through this myself, I can attest to the difficulty of this matter. Yet, I rest assured, my burdens cast upon Christ, my heart unstirred and free from regret.

Just as the two strangers in the story above, I am comforted by Christ’s instructions: Let the dead bury their own dead, but you go and proclaim the kingdom of God,” (Luke 9:60).

And so it is now that I leave you with my sincere prayers… and I leave you in the loving care of our Lord Jesus Christ as I close with the profound words of Dr. Machen:

“If the liberal party really obtains full control of the councils of the Church, then no evangelical Christian can continue to support the Church’s work… To do so would mean the most terrible bloodguiltiness which it is possible to conceive. If the liberal party, therefore, really obtains control of the Church, evangelical Christians must be prepared to withdraw no matter what it costs. Our Lord has died for us, and surely we must not deny Him for favor of men.”

In search of doctrinal clarity…

This is Article #6 is a series on confronting apostasy in the church. You can read the last article HERE.


I began redefining my tree painting, bringing focus and detail to the blurred foliage. Adding dots of color, greens and blues, depth and visual clarity slowly returned.

Clarity… that magic word…

Clarity… Isn’t that what so many of us seek?

Clarity… Isn’t that what so many churches have forsaken?

 

 

 

In my last article, I discussed the three preliminary principles of motivation for confronting apostasy in one’s church:

  1. First, love must be your motivation in confronting apostasy.
  2. Second, self-sacrifice must be this love’s demonstration.
  3. The third principle I want to reiterate is this: Biblical truth is the issue.

If you have not read the last article, please do so before proceeding.

What the Bible says:

Dr. Paul M. Elliott of Teaching the Word Ministries has written an excellent series on what the Bible teaches us about confronting apostasy.

As he correctly points out, we have been given instructions through God’s Word:

So let me now come to the process itself. We find the process for dealing with apostasy, in fact for dealing with offenses of all kinds, given to us in Matthew 18:15-17. We find there a process set forth by the Lord Jesus Christ himself. Jesus said this:

If your brother sins against you, go and tell him his fault between you and him alone. If he hears you, you have gained your brother. But if he will not hear, take with you one or two more, that “by the mouth of two or three witnesses every word may be established.” And if he refuses to hear them, tell it to the church. But if he refuses even to hear the church, let him be to you like a heathen and a tax collector. (Matthew 18:15-17)

Here we find a four-step process:

  • First, go to your brother alone and make his offense known. If he hears you, you have gained your brother. The force of the original language is that if your brother will pay attention to what you are saying and will repent, you have helped your brother to escape from evil.
  • Second, if he will not hear you, take one or two others with you and speak to him again.
  • Third, if he still refuses to hear, bring the matter before the church as a body.
  • Fourth, if he refuses even to hear the church, then treat him not as your brother, but as an unbeliever.

Be humble, but alert:

Pastors are humans and make mistakes. A single departure from scripture may simply have been an honest mistake.

Still, it is prudent to keep in mind the words of John Calvin:

Truth is not always nurtured in the bosom of the pastors…

Private situations versus public situations:

Private sins should be confronted privately, while public sins should be confronted publicly.

The risk to souls posed by the public teaching of false doctrine is acutely emphasized by Dr. Elliott:

If someone has persisted in false teaching from the pulpit, or in a Sunday school class, or in a home Bible study, or has persistently written false teaching in books or other publications, this is a public matter. It is not a private sin. And so it immediately becomes a matter to be dealt with by the church as a body, and not on a private basis. That is because there is more than the spiritual welfare of one individual or a even handful of individuals at stake. The spiritual welfare of the entire church is at stake.

There are several Biblical examples of public confrontation, including:

  1. in the epistle of Third John: Apostle John said he was going to publicly confront Diotrephes, the pastor of a local church, about his falsehoods;
  2. and in Galatians chapter two: Apostle Paul publicly confronted the Apostle Peter at Antioch when Peter publicly strayed into legalism.

Expect hostility in return:

If there’s one thing you can count on it is resistance. In fact, the simple act of politely questioning, for example, a popular evangelist, is the one of the easiest ways to make yourself unpopular.

Dr. Elliott even gives real-life examples and probable outcomes to prepare you, which you can read about here.

Remember to be humble and steadfast in your defense of God’s Word. Accept hardship. Remember that souls are at stake.

The Truth is the goal.

Examples of public confrontations:

Public confrontations may take on different forms. Some choose to write, such as myself, others use technology such as Twitter or podcasts. Also, some people may choose local vestry meetings, et al.

Example 1:

What I am about to say may make you angry and cause me to lose favor in your sight. Nevertheless, I will proceed with love and with truth: Beth Moore is a hugely popular evangelist. She says many scripturally-based things, but, through her lack of Berean-diligence, a lack of exegesis and through her insistence on undisciplined allegorical interpretation, she has become, over the years, more and more prone to veering wildly off course (scripturally speaking).

For example, in November of 2017, Beth Moore tweeted the following:

BM1

In response, a minister tweeted a response:

BM2

It is utterly bizarre that Beth Moore would paint Noah as having some sort of negative instinct and then extend that negativity upon the rest of us.

Noah acted on faith:

By faith Noah, when warned about things not yet seen, in godly fear built an ark to save his family. By faith he condemned the world and became heir of the righteousness that comes by faith. – Hebrews 11:7

Noah’s faith in God is a positive example for us, not a negative one. The minister was right to correct Beth Moore’s scriptural folly.

Example 2:

Recently, at the MLK 50 conference, the ministerial visionaries of a world-infected doctrine – a false gospel obsessed with the aesthetics of pigmentation ratios in the pews – preached a false doctrine of superficial, identitarian justice.

In a brave response, two black theologians who rightly and Biblically reject the false category of race – Darrell B. Harrison and Virgil Walker – released two different podcasts (which I encourage you to listen to) denouncing the growing apostasy of this mankind-driven false doctrine within evangelical churches:

  1. MLK 50 CONFERENCE
  2. SIN BY PROXY

Here’s the takeaway:

If you wish to save souls, if you wish to liberate others (and yourself) from the shackles of sin, doctrinal Truth is the answer. Those possessing a deep concern for others and a genuine love of Christ must safeguard The Word.

You will face many obstacles. You will face rejection from every direction; from foes, as well as from friends and from those with whom you believe you have alliances.

As I clearly state in the disclaimer to my website, “readers of this blog with likely be presented with an inconvenient truth at one point or another.”

The Truth matters.

Every voice matters.

Your voice matters.

Clarity matters.


There will be one, final post in this series. It will be the most difficult: What to do when your church fully rejects Gospel Truth?

Antibodies of the church, soldiers of Christ

In this way, each of us has a special role to play: the role of a righteous antibody. – We are the antibodies of the church: righteous fighters, salvation’s soldiers.

Project 3, post 5: We are the antibodies of the church, the soldiers of Christ

This is the 5th part of Project 3. You can read Part 1 HERE, Part 2 HERE, Part 3 HERE, and Part 4 HERE.

 

Periodically we are treated to the sight of a rainbow stretching wide across the sky, or vivid sunsets of red and pink, purple and blue. During such times, the colors that we typically spot in the landscape of God’s plentiful earth, we can also find high above, beautifully complimenting the pastel sky.

 

To mimic these stunning moments of symmetry, testaments to the splendor of the Almighty, I began bringing the colors found in the sky and in the foliage of the tree in my on-going piece down into the grassy meadow below.

 

Note: Painting involves mixing paints to create various colors. Because of this, it is important to stagger the stages of your painting, keeping in mind the paint you wish to use in multiple areas should be carried out in a fashion that does not lend itself to the premature drying-out of your paints.

 

Artistic process:

 

  • First, I redefined the border between the meadow with a simple, thin brown line. Next, I used a matte black to define the roots of the tree, creating shadows. White was added to define highlights and add the illusion of texture and dimension.

 

  • Using the tip of my pinky finger, I smudged the black paint onto the canvas, drawing it out away from the roots, creating depth. I also smudged black along various areas of the grass away from the roots of the tree.

 

  • Again, using the tip of my pinky finger, I smudged teal paint along the outside of the shadows beneath the tree. The dark, teal-gray paint was the same color I used as the base color for the foliage of the tree. Like the black, I carried this color into the broader body of grass.

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I observed the many shades of reds and oranges and flecks of yellow which were so vibrant in the sky of the piece.

 

Keeping in mind that the tree’s broad branches would, in real life, cast a shadow upon the ground below, I plotted areas toward the edges of the canvas that would remain brightly lit from the vibrant sun.

 

  • Using a half-inch wide, flat-faced brush with stiff bristles, I used left to right dragging stroke to punctuate the grassy field with reds and oranges and hints of creamy yellow. The yellow was used to emphasize the most sunlit areas of the landscape.

 

When painting landscapes, the infusion of darks and lights and various colors can serve to define elevation changes of the earth.

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Sprigs of grass can be added to these elevation indicators to further develop the impression of fluctuations in elevation, such as with small mounds or sloping hills, as seen in the example (below) of a different painting.

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  • Mixing paints, I created five different shades of green, from very light to very dark.

 

  • Using a small, very thin, round-tipped brush, I applied sprigs of grass with brisk strokes upward; starting at the base of the blade of grass and then sweeping upward.

 

  • I also used the green paint to further define the earthen base for the grass. I applied a few random lines, from left to right, and pulls blades of grass out and upward from each.

 

  • Lighter shades of green were used in areas of direct sunlight; darker shades in the shadows.

 

  • I made sure to sporadically group clumps of grass around the roots of the tree to create depth.

 

I stood back a few feet from the painting and observed the balance of color. Having carried colors from the sky and the dark grayish-teal down into the meadow, I decided to add one last touch.

 

  • Using the same, round brush I had used to apply the vibrant, deep blue “dots” in the foliage of the tree, I carried that color and the dots down into the grass.

 

  • I applied the dots heavily around the base of the tree; then thinned them outward.

 

The below image shows the painting as completed after the above steps.

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Reflection:

 

As I stood back to take in the piece, at all that I had done thus far, those bright blue dots popped out at me. Those vibrant dots felt as if they were alive; tiny balls of energy, as if the very life source of the meadow and of the grand ol’ tree itself.

 

As I gazed up my painting I realized that those splendid bits of blue were symbolic embodiments of the souls of Bible-believing, faithful Christians…

 

Throughout this project – dealing with the need for the body of Christ to reclaim our churches from the grips of apostacy – I have written at length about the need for each one of us to take responsibility for both reading and studying God’s precious Word, and for safeguarding His Word from misapplication and abuse. We must hold tight to sound doctrine.

 

In this way, each of us has a special role to play: the role of a righteous antibody.

 

Scattered amongst the branches of the tree and sprinkled in the meadow below, each vibrant blue dot – each dedicated, Bible-believing Christian – acts as an antibody, serving to prohibit the infection of heresy from progressing. If we each do our job, we prevent the disease from running rampant.

 

For this reason we have a very important task: In essence, we must be missionaries within our own congregations, apostles within our own churches.

 

We are the antibodies of the church: righteous fighters, salvation’s soldiers.

 

And, that’s a pretty cool thing indeed!

 

So, now I wish to close from a few verses from 2 Timothy:

2 Timothy 2New Living Translation (NLT)

A Good Soldier of Christ Jesus

Timothy, my dear son, be strong through the grace that God gives you in Christ Jesus. You have heard me teach things that have been confirmed by many reliable witnesses. Now teach these truths to other trustworthy people who will be able to pass them on to others.

Endure suffering along with me, as a good soldier of Christ Jesus.Soldiers don’t get tied up in the affairs of civilian life, for then they cannot please the officer who enlisted them. And athletes cannot win the prize unless they follow the rules. And hardworking farmers should be the first to enjoy the fruit of their labor. Think about what I am saying. The Lord will help you understand all these things.

Always remember that Jesus Christ, a descendant of King David, was raised from the dead. This is the Good News I preach. And because I preach this Good News, I am suffering and have been chained like a criminal. But the word of God cannot be chained. 10 So I am willing to endure anything if it will bring salvation and eternal glory in Christ Jesus to those God has chosen.

11 This is a trustworthy saying:

If we die with him,
we will also live with him.
12 If we endure hardship,
we will reign with him.
If we deny him,
he will deny us.
13 If we are unfaithful,
he remains faithful,
for he cannot deny who he is.

Project 1, Post 7: A Little Elbow Grease

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Reflection:

Holding a hard-bristled dish brush in one hand, I stared at my painting contemplating what I was about to do to it, to inflict upon it. I took one last deep breath and then began scrubbing my painting with ferocity and determination. I scrubbed – and I scrubbed – and I scrubbed – chipping away at the very paint I had purposefully laid upon that canvas. I chiseled away parts of the blue flower petals that I had so carefully composed.

I was on a mission to expose flecks of the aluminum foil squares that I had used as the foundation beneath my painting. It was actually working! It sure was not easy though. Actually, the entire scrubbing process required far more elbow grease than I had anticipated. It also took some time. Nevertheless, I began to be filled with more and more pleasure as the fruit of my labor began to be seen.

As I continued, switching off between arms after one became tired from scrubbing, I remembered a brief verse in the book of Genesis.

“The LORD God took the man and put him in the Garden of Eden to work it and take care of it.” (Genesis, 2:15)

Wait… Adam had to work when he was living in the Garden of Eden? Yes, he sure did. We (humans) were designed by God to toil, to work (in many different forms of course). Even in Eden, life for Adam and Eve was not without effort.

Sometimes we can become discouraged at our constant toils, wishing life were an endless vacation. However, hard work is often a blessing in disguise. Work gives us pleasure and satisfaction in seeing the products of our labor. Work gives us purpose and a sense of self-worth. Work allows us to find a sense of value and pride in ourselves, often when we need it the most.

So, whatever you do each day – whether it is sowing a field, filing paperwork, waking repeatedly in the night to feed a crying baby, turning wrenches, raising children, flipping burgers, etc. – do it heartily. The fruits of your labor might not be seen right away, but in time you shall be blessed.

“Commit your work to the Lord, and your plans will be established.” (Proverbs 16:3)

Artistic Process:

You have probably seen old buildings with paintings on the side. Although weathering and age have stripped pieces of those paintings away you can still see the integrity of the images. That was my goal in scrubbing my painting in order to allow the aluminum to peak through. I didn’t want to demolish my work, but instead allow small flecks of foil to add depth, texture and character to the piece.

Project 1, Post 5: From Blue Blobs to Blue Flowers, Having the Strength to Stay the Course

Project 1, Post 5: From Blue Blobs to Blue Flowers, Having the Strength to Stay the Course

Prelude:

I love springtime! My favorite color happens to be blue, so I decided on painting simplistic, blue flowers over my canvas’s background. I wanted to paint in the utmost simplest of fashions, omitting my usual artistic flares or intensities. First I simply laid out the general area of the flowers by painting a blue base color to form the general shape of three flowers.

Ah! For some reason it startled me! I can’t articulate exactly why, for even I still don’t entirely understand my sudden and strong emotions that my actions induced. I was just startled.

“Oh no!” I thought to myself, “I’ve ruined my painting!”

“What was I thinking?”

“I can’t do this right.”

Well, there is a well-documented and long, long history (from the beginning of time, really) of us humans acting based solely on emotions and feeling. This action of events has rarely lead us flawed creatures in the right direction. After all, emotions have a tendency to take over our typically rational selves and turn us into “non-thinkers.”

I realized, “Why am I questioning myself?” “Paige, you know how to paint a flower!”

“Why on Earth would you be second guessing yourself over this?”

Ding! Ding! Ding!

So, I charged onward, staying the course.

Reflection:

A lot of things in the world today evoke a great deal of emotions. Christians are typically very empathetic and our sympathies can often lead us to question our own Christian beliefs and can sometimes even lead us to act against our own well-being or against the well-being of others. The course of events in life and in politics can be very, very confusing. Sometimes we may feel at odds with our own religion, especially as the world and our society begin to replace basic Christian morals with new, “progressive,” worldly morals of right and wrong.

It is extremely easy for us to slip down the wrong road and allow our compassion and empathy for others to convince ourselves that we silly Christians had simply been misunderstanding the unchanged words of God and Jesus for over two thousand years.

This is acting on emotion. This same act can also lead us into a new kind of arrogance, as if we “new Christians” know better, are smarter and are the only all-knowing, true Christians. Ah, but BEWARE! There is no virtue in being arrogant and smug. Nor is there any virtue in assuming the word of God can be deconstructed to conform to any set of ever changing worldly ideologies.

Instead, we Christians must stay the course, steady in His truth.

This is not an easy task. So, I offer the following scripture as a bit of encouragement and guidance to help you stay steady on your feet and on the true path of the Lord: (1 John, 2:15-17)

“Do not love the world or the things in the world. The love of the Father is not in those who love the world; for all that is in the world – the desire of the flesh, the desire of the eyes, the pride of riches – comes not from the Father but from the world. And the world and its desire are passing away, but those who do the will of God will live forever.”

Artistic Process

First I laid out the location for the three flowers using a medium blue base. I did not focus on the precise shape of a flower, as those details take away from the freeing element in artistic process. Next, I used a darker blue from the same blue-toned family to add variation. This was done using free, quick strokes from a medium-sized paintbrush. I made sure to leave the lighter, base blue color visible around the edges to form the illusion of petals. I made sure not to apply the darker blue in a uniform way. God’s natural world is not uniform. In real flowers, the positions of the petals and the direction of lights, as well as things like other leaves that might obscure the light, create a varying shade within each individual flower petal.  Instead of getting too caught up in where the darker blue “should” go, it is important to remember that you can always paint over it.

*Next, I will be adding more depth to my flowers…. The process continues!